FMD#47

Ruined maquette and molds for Fannie Mae Duncan Maquette

The finished clay maquette was taken to the mold maker who proceeded to make the mold of the clay. Sadly the original sculpture is completely ruined in the process but you can see what’s left of the sculpture as well as the two molds above. The larger mold holds the body and the smaller mold is the right forearm and the purse.

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

Here is the main wax body with the purse and forearm poured separately. The large wax tube extended from the hip to the base is the pour spout. The mold maker added a clay form onto my clay sculpture to serve as the funnel when pouring the wax into the mold. He also removed the arm (you can see the square post that is part of my armature) for casting and pouring.

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

From the back you can see where the armature back iron supported the sculpture cast into wax.

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

Not unexpected but still a bummer - the wax simply didn’t make it all the way down to the bottom of the spike heel - it’s such a small area to try to pour. That means that I will be re-sculpting the heel in wax and attaching it to the shoe.

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

First up - I remove the large pour spout by heating my knife over a flame and cutting through the wax. This, of course, will leave a large hole that I will need to repair. I measure and cut a ‘plug’ that fits the hole and then have to use a burning tool to melt the edges of the plug into the edges of the body. Once that plug cools I then go back in with my wax tools and rework the surface so that it blends in seamlessly.

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

As you can see from the wax pouring of the fingers and heels, small, thin areas are difficult to impossible to pour in wax. Therefore, rather than sculpting the handle of the purse, the metal workers at the foundry will construct the handle of the purse in bronze and weld it onto the purse. Sine the maquette will be indoors and not a public work, it will hang freely from the handle strap over her wrist, unlike the large public work sculpture, which will have the purse welded onto the body for security.


Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

The back iron removed and seamlessly chased away, the fingers chased, heels fixed and her arm now reattached to her body - she’s ready for the foundry to be cast in bronze!

Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy
Fannie Mae Duncan Wax Maquette ©Lori Kiplinger Pandy

The wax is now at the foundry and will be cast in bronze and given a traditional french brown patina and mounted onto a granite base. More information about the price and how to purchase this bronze “Everybody Welcome” sculpture will be in upcoming blog posts.

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